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Roman Portraits in Context 28 September 2009

Posted by Troels in : Archaeology, Quick Notes , add a comment

Jane Fejfer’s much anticipated book (and Habilitationsschrift) “Roman Portraits in Context” came out earlier this year.

The entire Hablitation defense, held on 29 May, is now available as a streaming webcast on the University of Copenhagen website. So bring your own popcorn and learn a thing or two about Roman portraits! The official “opponents” (as they are called in Denmark) were Professor Natalie Kampen, Columbia University, and Professor Karsten Friis-Nielsen, University of Copenhagen. A number of other scholars present questions ex auditorio as well.

Roofs of Piraeus 15 August 2009

Posted by Troels in : Making of the Archaeological Record, Photography , add a comment

I dug out some old photos taken on the roofs of Piraeus back in 2004. These roofs (and the life that takes place there), quite typical of many Mediterranean cities, have always fascinated me. At a quite trivial level, I guess my fascination (at least in part) stems from a Northern European envy of the pleasures of Mediterranean outdoor life. At another, the use of roof top space reminds me of certain prehistoric sites, such as Çatalhöyük (I’m especially fascinated by the endless numbers of stairs that are found on the roofs of Greek condominiums). And yes, part of my fascination is definitely also rooted in a profoundly archaeological interest in the processes of decay and site formation.

Piræus' tage
Piraeus. Photo: TMK, October 2004.

Piræus' tage

Piraeus. Photo: TMK, October 2004.

Piræus' tage

Piraeus. Photo: TMK, October 2004.

Piræus' tage
Piraeus. Photo: TMK, October 2004.

Piræus' tage

Piraeus. Photo: TMK, October 2004.

Contrasting Archaeological Narratives in Jerusalem 13 August 2009

Posted by Troels in : Archaeology, Ethics , 2 comments

Palestinian neighbourhood
Silwan, Jerusalem, to the right, the City of David Archaeological Park, to the left, the Palestinian neighbourhood of Silwan/Wadi Hilwa. Photo: TMK, June 2009.

As archaeological sites go, few are as contested as Jerusalem. The website “From Shiloah to Silwan: An Alternative Archaeological Tour of Ancient Jerusalem” presents an important contrasting narrative to that promoted by the City of David Archaeological Park, the archaeological site-cum-theme park south of the Haram al-Sharif/Temple Mount that is operated by a Jewish NGO with its own political agenda. When I visited, the site was packed with Israeli school children changing into swimming trunks to walk through Hezekiah’s Tunnel. An immersive journey into nationhood indeed.

See also “Elad seeks approval for new construction project in City of David” (Haaretz, 23 July 2009) and the website of the Wadi Hilwah Information Centre.

When On Google Earth 69 20 July 2009

Posted by Troels in : Carnival , 10 comments

When on Google Earth makes its third appearance on Iconoclasm with this 69th edition. If you don’t know the rules of the game, please see the quick introduction below. Here’s this edition’s GE image – can you identify the site?

WOGE69

The Rules of When on Google Earth are as follows:
Q: What is When on Google Earth?
A: It’s a game for archaeologists, or anybody else willing to have a go!

Q: How do you play it?
A: Simple, you try to identify the site in the picture.

Q: Who wins?
A: The first person to correctly identify the site, including its major period of occupation, wins the game!

Q: What does the winner get?
A: The winner gets bragging rights and the chance to host the next When on Google Earth on his/her own blog!

(more…)

When On Google Earth 67 14 July 2009

Posted by Troels in : Carnival , 4 comments

When On Google Earth is back on Iconoclasm for its 67th edition. I had had a site in mind, but then I decided to digress a little bit from the Mediterranean/Near Eastern “mainstream” of this little game. So without further ado, here’s this edition’s challenge:

WOGE67

Update: Too hard? I’m going to zoom out a little bit and give another clue. The site at hand dates to the same period that I covered in the last edition of WOGE featured on this site.

WOGE67-2

Update 2: I had a feeling this would be difficult…but here’s another clue in the form of a slightly modified photograph showing the archaeological feature in question:

WOGE67-3

The Rules of When on Google Earth are as follows:
Q: What is When on Google Earth?
A: It’s a game for archaeologists, or anybody else willing to have a go!

Q: How do you play it?
A: Simple, you try to identify the site in the picture.

Q: Who wins?
A: The first person to correctly identify the site, including its major period of occupation, wins the game!

Q: What does the winner get?
A: The winner gets bragging rights and the chance to host the next When on Google Earth on his/her own blog!

Last but not least, I’m re-introducing the Table of Victors (below the fold). If you win, please maintain this table and post it with your edition of WhenOnGE. Perhaps someone would be willing to do a central site with the list of winners at some point (this would also make it easier to know which sites have been featured when choosing new ones)? (more…)

A Break 25 June 2009

Posted by Troels in : General, Quick Notes, Thesis Rant , 1 comment so far

Caesarea Maritima
The “Byzantine Esplanade” at Caesarea Maritima, Israel, discussed in one of the articles below. Photo: TMK, June 2009.

Things have been slow on this blog, not only recently, but for a while. This will not change in the near future (although posts may randomly appear), due to a little thing called Dissertation. Instead, I will would like to point to the following forthcoming publications of mine that may be of interest to readers of this blog:

“Embodied Images: Christian Response and Destruction in Late Antique Egypt”, Journal of Late Antiquity 2 (2), autumn 2009.

“Religious Conflict in Late Antique Alexandria: Christian Responses to ’Pagan’ Statues in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries AD”, Alexandria – A Religious and Cultural Melting Pot, eds. G. Hinge & J. Krasilnikoff, pp. 158-176. Aarhus Studies in Mediterranean Antiquity vol. 9. Aarhus: Aarhus University Press.

”The Display of Statues in the Late Antique Cities of the Eastern Mediterranean: Reflections on Memory, Meaning, and Aesthetics”, Debating Late Antique Urbanism: Within and Beyond the Walls, eds. G. Speed & D. Sami. Leicester Monographs in Archaeology. Leicester: School of Archaeology and Ancient History.

Explanation Is Not Allowed 22 June 2009

Posted by Troels in : Archaeology, Quick Notes, Travel , 2 comments

Explanation Is Not Allowed
A message to interpretive archaeologists? Seen in the National Archaeological Museum, Amman. Photo: TMK, May 2009.

When On Google Earth 47 15 June 2009

Posted by Troels in : Carnival , 5 comments

Welcome to When On Google Earth 47, hosted by Iconoclasm. Here’s this edition’s challenge – can you identify the archaeological site?

GoogleEarth

The Rules of When on Google Earth are as follows:
Q: What is When on Google Earth?
A: It’s a game for archaeologists, or anybody else willing to have a go!

Q: How do you play it?
A: Simple, you try to identify the site in the picture.

Q: Who wins?
A: The first person to correctly identify the site, including its major period of occupation, wins the game.

Q: What does the winner get?
A: The winner gets bragging rights and the chance to host the next When on Google Earth on his/her own blog!

(more…)

On The Road 25 May 2009

Posted by Troels in : Photography, Travel , add a comment

Apamea Colonnaded Street
The colonnaded street at Apamea, Syria. Photo: TMK, October 2008.

I’m off to the Middle East tomorrow for some final dissertation travel. Meanwhile, here are some photos of the colonnaded street at Apamea.

Apamea Colonnaded Street
The colonnaded street at Apamea, Syria. Photo: TMK, October 2008.

Apamea Colonnaded Street
The colonnaded street at Apamea, Syria. Photo: TMK, October 2008.

Apamea Colonnaded Street
The colonnaded street at Apamea, Syria. Photo: TMK, October 2008.

Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek Back in the News 18 May 2009

Posted by Troels in : Archaeology, Ethics , add a comment

The Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen was back in the news yesterday. Politiken reported on the recent negotiations between the museum and Italian authorities (“Glyptoteket tilbyder at udlevere etruskisk skat“, the Glyptotek offers to return Etruscan treasure; also reported in Jyllands-Posten with a slightly more smashing headline: “Glyptoteket afleverer plyndret skat“, the Glyptotek returns looted treasure). Only a few details from the negotiations have been made public. Apparently, the Glyptotek offered to return its Etruscan chariot, which was acquired through Hecht. Meanwhile, the Italians suggested a Getty-style deal that would allow the Glyptotek to exhibit artefacts (“much richer than those to be returned”) from Italian collections on a loan basis. Nonetheless, the negotiations seem to have come to a dead end. I expect the case will develop further over the coming months.

Previous coverage: here, here, here, here, and here. See also David Gill’s Looting Matters blog for the Glyptotek’s involvement with Hecht.